The Top 10 Rejected Meanings of TAKS

This is a guest post by Mister Teacher of Learn Me Good. Mister Teacher teaches third grade near Dallas, TX.

46654584667494Greetings, faithful readers of So You Want to Teach? Do not attempt to change the channel! We have taken control of the vertical; we have taken control of the horizontal; we have taken control of clichés and tag lines from old 60’s sci-fi television shows.

Joel has graciously offered me the opportunity to write a guest post here on his blog. So I suppose I should take a moment to identify myself. My name is Mister Teacher, and I have a drinking problem. No wait, now’s not the time to say that. Let me try that again. My name is Mister Teacher, and I write a blog called Learn Me Good. Feel free to check it out if you want to take a walk on the mild side.

Anyway, back to the guest post. Since I have been reading Joel’s stuff, I’ve noticed a trend. Quite often, his posts are some variation on the classic David Letterman Top Ten list. For instance, 9 Reasons to Quit Teaching, 25 Tips for Less Stress, 8 Euphemisms for Sharpening a Pencil, and the lists go on.So I thought it might be apropos that I wrote a guest post that was a top ten list. Since Joel and I both teach here in the great state of Texas, we are both overly familiar with the state standardized test, the TAKS.

TAKS stands for the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills, but my understanding is that that was not the original acronym.

Without further ado, here are The Top Ten Rejected Meanings of TAKS:

10) Texas Accepts Kids’ Suffering
9) That Aggravating Kidney Stone
8) Teachers against Knuckle Sandwiches
7) This Ain’t Kansas, Scarecrow
6) Talking About Kama Sutra
5) Testing All Kids Simultaneously
4) Throw Away Knowledge, Sonny
3) Think Again, Kindergarten Students
2) Take Another Kid’s Sanity
1) This Assessment Kinda Sucks

My great thanks to Joel for allowing me a new forum to peddle my rubbish. We now resume your normal broadcast, already in progress.

3 Comments on The Top 10 Rejected Meanings of TAKS

  1. Funny post! #5 is right on. That seems to be the big emphasis in my state, since some questions “got out” into the public -with the help of a newsreporter – before all students had taken that section (I guess not all students were taking the test on the same day throughout the state, even though I think we were supposed to).

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